CPI Guangdong Jieyang Qianzhan power station

From Global Energy Monitor

CPI Guangdong Jieyang Qianzhan power station (国家电投前詹港电有限公司) is a proposed 4,000-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant in Guangdong Province, China.

Location

The map below shows the location where the plant would be built in Qianzhan Town, Huilai County, Jieyang Prefecture, Guangdong Province.

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Background on Project

China Power Investment has proposed the 4,000 MW power station, to be built in two stages of 2,000 MW each. Construction is planned to begin in 2014.[1][2][3]

2016: Nationwide Restrictions Imposed on Development of Coal-Fired Power Capacity

Due to new restrictions announced during 2016 by the National Energy Administration and the National Development and Reform Commission, further capacity expansions at this location appear to be on hold or cancelled. For details, see China's 2016 Restrictions on Development of Coal-Fired Power Capacity.

Ownership

In July 2015, China Power Investment Corporation (CPI) and State Nuclear Power Technology Corporation (SNPTC) merged to become State Power Investment Corporation (国家电力投资集团), one of the five largest state-owned electricity producers in the People's Republic of China.[4]

Project Details

  • Sponsor: SPIC Qianzhan Port & Electricity Co
  • Parent company: CPI (now State Power Investment Corporation
  • Location: Qianzhan Town, Huilai County, Jieyang Prefecture, Guangdong Province, China
  • Coordinates: 22.935467, 116.391667(exact)
  • Status: Cancelled
  • Gross capacity: 4,000 MW (Units 1-4: 1,000 MW)
  • Type: Ultra-supercritical
  • Projected in service:
  • Coal type:
  • Coal source:
  • Source of financing:

Articles and resources

References

  1. "广东揭阳加速建中电投前詹电厂 撬动10亿元年产值," China News Network, 2014-02-27
  2. "中电投广东前詹电厂“上大压小”新建工程环境影响评价第一次信息公示," China Power Investment Corporation, November 8, 2013
  3. "中电投广东前詹电厂今年计划投入6亿元," Jieyang News, September 14, 2014
  4. "Chinese nuclear giant officially launched". World Nuclear Association. 16 July 2015. Retrieved 4 May 2015.

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External resources