Nova Seival power station

From Global Energy Monitor
(Redirected from Sul power station)

[português]

Nova Seival power station, formerly known as Sul thermal power station, is a proposed 726-megawatt coal-fired power station in Candiota, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The project would be supplied with coal from the Seival mine in Brazil.

Location

The map below shows Candiota, the approximate location where the plant would be built.

Loading map...

Background

In November 2009, MPX Energia obtained a preliminary permit for the Sul power project, with a stated generation capacity of 600MW. In December 2010, IBAMA (the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Natural Resources) approved an increase in the project's capacity to 727 MW.[1]

MPX (which changed its name to Eneva in October 2013 after joining forces with the German energy corporation E.ON) withdrew the Sul power project from consideration in Brazil's August 2013 national energy auction due to low energy prices.[2] Eneva did not register the Sul project for subsequent government energy auctions in December 2013, November 2014, or April 2015, although Sul's sister project, Seival thermal power project, was a participant in the latter two auctions.[3][4]

As of February 2015, Eneva continued to list both the Sul and Seival power projects on a single web page, implying that neither project had been conclusively abandoned. Sul's generating capacity was still listed as 727 MW, while Seival's was listed as 600 MW, and their combined generating capacity was specifically listed as 1327 MW, making it clear that these were two related but separate projects.

Eneva has since removed all references to the Sul project from its website. However, government energy forecasts published by Rio Grande do Sul state in 2016 continued to list Eneva Sul as an active project[5], and several August 2017 press reports specifically cited the Eneva Sul project as an eligible contender in Brazil’s December 2017 A-6 energy auction.[6][7][8] Ultimately, there were no successful bids from coal projects in the December 2017 auction, with the Brazilian government granting all new energy contracts to projects fueled by natural gas or renewables (mainly wind).[9]

In February 2019 Copelmi, majority owner of the Seival mine, purchased Eneva's stake in the mine for R$18 million, along with rights to the Sul power project; under the sales agreement, additional payments from Copelmi to Eneva would be conditioned on further development of the Sul power project, now renamed Nova Seival, through December 2024.[10]

Copelmi announced that it was seeking the necessary environmental license from the Brazilian energy agency IBAMA in hopes of including the Nova Seival project in Brazil's September 2019 A-6 energy auction.[11] The project was not included in the 2019 auction but Copelmi announced their intention to participate in the next auction in April 2020,[12] with an eye to commencing commercial operations by January 2026.[13]

In March 2020 Brazil's government announced that all national energy generation auctions would be postponed indefinitely due to the Covid-19 health crisis[14][15]; the date of the next A-6 auction was subsequently set for September 2021.[16]

In May 2021, Copelmi's subsidiary Energias da Campanha Ltda announced updated plans for the Nova Seival plant, noting that the project would be the first in Brazil to use supercritical technology, with a budget of US$ 1.3 billion and a 2027 commissioning date.[17]

Opposition

In June 2021, UTE Nova Seival was denounced by the Committee for Combating Mega Mining Companies in the State of Rio Grande do Sul (CCM-RS).[18]

Project Details

  • Sponsor: Energias da Campanha Ltda[17]
  • Parent company: Copelmi[10]
  • Location: Candiota, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • Coordinates: -31.6, -53.733333 (approximate)
  • Status: Pre-permit development
  • Gross Capacity: 726 MW[17][18]
  • Type: Supercritical[17]
  • Projected in service: 2027[17]
  • Coal Type:
  • Coal Source: Seival mine[13][17][18]
  • Source of financing:

Articles and resources

References

  1. "MPX finaliza compra da Seival". Exame. 2011-06-07.
  2. "MPX passa a se chamar Eneva". Época Negócios. September 11, 2013.
  3. "Carvão Mineral tem quatro projetos inscritos para o leilão de energia A-5,", SieceSC, July 1, 2014.
  4. "Leilão A-5 2015 cadastra 19.826 MW em novos projetos de energia, diz EPE". Reuters. 2015-02-05.
  5. "Boletim Técnico 36: Quantificação das Cinzas de Carvão Fóssil Produzidas no Brasil, p 10", Fundação de Ciência e Tecnologia, July 2016.
  6. "Uma nova chance para o carvão do Rio Grande do Sul,", Jornal do Comércio, August 8, 2017.
  7. "Projetos a carvão são confirmados em leilão,", Jornal do Comércio, August 9, 2017.
  8. "Termelétricas a carvão podem participar do leilão de energia,", Jornal Minuano, August 9, 2017.
  9. "Leilão A-6 viabiliza 3,8 GW e R$ 13,9 bilhões em novos investimentos," CanalEnergia, December 20, 2017
  10. 10.0 10.1 "Eneva vende participação na Seival Sul Mineração". Finance News. February 26, 2019.
  11. "Copelmi busca licença ambiental para concorrer em leilão de energia de setembro". Jornal Minuano. May 10, 2019.
  12. "Copelmi anuncia que trabalha para participar do leilão de energia em 2020 com o projeto da UTE Nova Seival em Candiota". Jornal Tribuna do Pampa. September 23, 2019.
  13. 13.0 13.1 "Copelmi projeta construção da Usina Nova Seival". Jornal Minuano. February 12, 2020.
  14. "MME posterga realização dos leilões de energia elétrica e de transmissão". EPE (Empresa de Pesquisa Energética). March 30, 2020.
  15. Sánchez Molina, Pilar (April 1, 2020). "Brazil postpones energy auctions". PV magazine.
  16. "Leilões de energia representam oportunidades para o setor". UNICA. December 9, 2020.
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 17.6 17.7 "Candiota pode receber primeira usina termelétrica do Brasil com tecnologia supercrítica". Jornal Minuano. May 1, 2021.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 "The advance of mega mining companies and the concentration of wealth against life and the common goods – Amigos da Terra Brasil". www.amigosdaterrabrasil.org.br (in português). Retrieved 2021-06-14.

Related GEM.wiki articles

External resources