Amer power station

From Global Energy Monitor

Amer power station is a 652.0-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant owned and operated by RWE in Geertruidenberg, the Netherlands.

Location

The map below shows the location of the plant in Geertruidenberg.

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Plant Data

  • Sponsor: RWE
  • Parent company: RWE
  • Plant Nameplate Capacity: 1353.0 MW (Megawatts)
  • Units and In-Service Dates: Unit 8: 701.0 MW (1981), Unit 9: 652.0 MW (1994)
  • Location: Amerweg 1, 4931 NC, Geertruidenberg, Noord-Brabant, Netherlands
  • GPS Coordinates: 51.709806, 4.843661 (exact)
  • Type: Supercritical
  • Coal Type: Bituminous
  • Coal Consumption:
  • Coal Source: Mixed Imports
  • Unit Retirements: Unit 8 was retired in 2015, Unit 9 scheduled for complete conversion to biomass before 2025.

Background on Plant

Amer power station was a two-unit coal-fired power plant, Amer 8 and 9, with a total capacity of 1,353.0 MW. The units were completed between 1981 and 1994, and owned by RWE. The subcritical Amer 8 unit was closed at the end of 2015.[1]

Amer 9 is planned for retirement by 2025. RWE says it wants "to reduce CO2-emissions of Amer 9 by increasing co-firing of biomass up to 50%" before 2020 and up to 100% before 2025.[2]

Unit 9 of the plant is currently powered by 50% coal and 50% biomass (sawdust pellets) with plans to increase biomass to 80% by the end of 2020. They also have a wood gasification plant onsite that can process waste timber into woodgas, clean it and cofire with the biomass and coal. At the moment the system is not in use but it can be upgraded and put back into operation if subsidies are made availible in the future.[3]

Planned expansion cancelled

A 1,000-MW coal-fired unit planned to extend the site was cancelled in May 2008.[1]

Solar Expansion

The power plant has 2,024 solar panels on the roof of the main building where units 6 and 7 (natural gas) and 8 (coal) were located, with plans for expansion of 8,000 solar panels on land and 20,000 floating solar panels with tracking system on the waterbassin on the terrain. [4]

Articles and resources

References

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