Ciprel power station

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Ciprel power station is an operating power station of at least 366-megawatts (MW) in Port-Bouët, Vridi, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.


Location

Table 1: Project-level location details

Plant name Location Coordinates (WGS 84)
Ciprel power station Port-Bouët, Vridi, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire 5.2643, -4.0198 (exact)[1]

The map below shows the exact location of the power station.

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Unit-level coordinates (WGS 84):

  • Unit GT8: 5.26429, -4.01981
  • Unit GT9-GT10-CC1: 5.26429, -4.01981


Project Details

Table 2: Unit-level details

Unit name Status Fuel(s) Capacity (MW) Technology CHP Start year Retired year
Unit GT8 operating[2] gas, fuel oil[3] 111 MW[3] gas turbine[3] - - -
Unit GT9-GT10-CC1 operating[2] gas, fuel oil[2][3] 255 MW[4][3] combined cycle[5][6] - - -

CHP is an abbreviation for Combined Heat and Power. It is a technology that produces electricity and thermal energy at high efficiencies. Coal units track this information in the Captive Use section when known.


Table 3: Unit-level ownership and operator details

Unit name Owner Parent
Unit GT8 Compagnie Ivoirienne de Production d’Electricité (CIPREL) Emerging Capital Partners [53.00%]; other [30.00%]; AXA Entities [17.00%]
Unit GT9-GT10-CC1 Compagnie Ivoirienne de Production d’Electricité (CIPREL) Emerging Capital Partners [53.00%]; other [30.00%]; AXA Entities [17.00%]


Background

Phase 1: 99 MW (not tracked in GGPT since each unit <50 MW)

Phase 2: 111 MW GT

Phase 3: 111 MW

Phase A new GT 10: 111 MW GT

Phase B: Phase 3 111 MW GT + 111 MW ST → 222 MW CC

In 1994, the Compagnie Ivoirienne de Production d’Electricité (CIPREL) was established as the first independent power producer in Côte d’Ivoire.[7]

The first three phases had a total output of 321 MW. The turbines in the first three phases were equipped with multi-fuel (natural gas and oil-based fuel backup) capabilities. These turbines use natural gas from offshore resources in Ivorian waters for base load production.

In 1995, Phase I: Three (3) General Electric MS 6001 B-type gas turbines, each with a capacity of 33 MW, were commissioned.[7]

In June 1997, Phase II: with a capacity of 111 MW, was commissioned.[7]

In December 2009,  Phase III: with a capacity of 111 MW, started production. Implementing Phase III of CIPREL (111 MW) increased the production capacity from 210 to 321 MW. Again in 2009, the Government of Côte d'Ivoire asked CIPREL to study the possibility of switching to combined cycle gas turbines to increase its power production, a project which was later named CIPREL IV.[7][8][9][10] CIPREL IV implemented a combined cycle on the Gas Turbine 9 (GT9) from Phase III and on the new Gas Turbine (GT10), adding a steam turbine, strengthening power generation capacity with an increase of up to 543 MW. Thus, CIPREL IV was meant to:  Strengthen the country's electricity supply by increasing the current facility's capacity.[7] The International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, the African Development Bank (AfDB), and Proparco jointly financed this project. The Dutch development bank (FMO) and the Emerging Africa Infrastructure Fund (EAIF) joined the lender group after the financial close in 2014. The project had investment costs amounting to 225 billion CFA francs or 340 million Euros (US $344 million).[11] CIPREL IV project was built in two phases.

In October 2013, Phase A was commissioned to install a new gas turbine (GT10) with an installed capacity of 111 MW.[7]

In December 2015, Phase B: implementing a combined cycle gas turbine using GT9 (from Phase III) and GT10 (CIPREL IV) and connecting them to a Steam Turbine (ST), was expected to be commissioned but was later commissioned in February 2016.[7]

In February 2016, the CIPREL IV power station was commissioned.  By the end of 2016, the plant was providing power to 120,000 additional homes per year while reducing greenhouse emissions equivalent to 180,000 tons of Carbon dioxide per year.[7]

With this project, CIPREL  was expected to consolidate its position as the most powerful thermal power plant in Côte d'Ivoire, with a total installed capacity of 543 MW and an annual production of nearly 4 billion kWh.[12]

The Impacts of the CIPREL IV  :[12]

  • Reinforced the total capacity of the plant by 222 MW to better meet the country's needs[13]
  • Produces electricity from a steam turbine without additional consumption of natural gas
  • Improved energy efficiency through the vapor recovery
  • Limited Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions thanks to the steam turbine, which avoids the release of 180000 tonnes of CO2 per year[14]

CIPREL IV financing

Multilateral and bilateral support for the expansion of the CIPREL thermal power plant in Côte d’Ivoire was as follows:[9]

• IFC provided a €100 million loan and acted as lead arranger mobilizing an additional €100 million financing package from FMO and EAIF.

• AfDB provided a €50 million loan, and Proparco provided a €50 million loan.


Articles and Resources

References

  1. https://www.google.com/maps/place/CIPREL+(Ivorian+Company+of+Electricity+Production)/@5.2599505,-4.0109274,1324m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0xfc1e918e173cf6b:0x70e5d7fb21b42efe!8m2!3d5.2617321!4d-4.0096797. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Ivory Coast Electricity Production Company". Eranove. Archived from the original on May 5, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 "African Development Bank - Building today, a better Africa tomorrow" (PDF). www.afdb.org. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  4. "Cote d'Ivoire - Atinkou (CIPREL V) 390 MW Gas Power Project". projectsportal.afdb.org. Archived from the original on May 7, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  5. "Compagnie Ivoirienne de Production d'Electricité". www.ciprel.ci. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2022.
  6. "Ciprel Power, Cote d'Ivoire". www.ifc.org. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 "CIPREL EXPANSION PROJECT" (PDF). June 2013.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. "Ciprel Power, Cote d'Ivoire". www.ifc.org. Retrieved 2022-07-28.
  9. 9.0 9.1 "library.pppknowledgelab.org/documents/4687/download". Archived from the original on June 2, 2021.
  10. Anita Anyango (2018-05-17). "Atinkou power plant project (Ciprel 5) update". Construction Review Online. Retrieved 2022-07-28.
  11. "CIPREL IV project".{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. 12.0 12.1 "CIPREL IV project".{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. "Ciprel Power, Cote d'Ivoire". www.ifc.org. Archived from the original on June 2, 2021. Retrieved January 29, 2022.
  14. "CIPREL EXPANSION PROJECT" (PDF). June 2013.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

Additional data

To access additional data, including an interactive map of gas-fired power stations, a downloadable dataset, and summary data, please visit the Global Oil and Gas Plant Tracker on the Global Energy Monitor website.