Eynez coal mine

From Global Energy Monitor
This article is part of the CoalSwarm coverage of Turkey and coal.
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Funding

The Eynez coal mine, also known as the Soma mine, is an underground mine, operated by Aegean Lignite Enterprises (Ege Linyitleri Isletme Muessesesii Mudurlugu), a subsidiary of TKI, a government-owned company, producing 10.5 million tonnes per annum, in Eynez, near Soma, Manisa Province, Turkey.[1]

The mine was the site of the Soma mine disaster in 2014.

Background

The Soma coal mine is operated by Ege Linyitleri Isletme Muessesesii Mudurlugu, a subsidiary of TKI, a government-owned company.

On 13 May 2014, an explosion at Eynez coal mine, caused an underground mine fire, which burned until 15 May.[2][3] In total, 301 people were killed in what was the worst mine disaster in Turkey's history. The mine, operated by coal producer Soma Kömür İşletmeleri A.Ş., suffered an explosion, the cause of which is still under investigation.[4][5] The fire occurred at the mine's shift work, and 787 workers were underground at the time of the explosion. After the final bodies were pulled from the mine on 17 May 2014, four days after the fire, the Minister of Energy and Natural Resources Taner Yıldız confirmed the number of dead was 301.[6] Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD) announced the names of 301 workers who died in the mine disaster[7] and 486 people who survived[8][9] but some politicians claimed that the number of dead is more than 340.[10][11][12]

Miners protested against dangerous mining conditions in late 2013 and the demand by the main opposition party, the Republican People's Party, to investigate the mine's safety was rejected in the Grand National Assembly of Turkey with votes from the ruling Justice and Development Party only weeks before the disaster.[13]

In 2018, tenders for several coal mines were held, including Soma.[14] A tender of a 139 million ton field is due 15 May.[15]

Location

The map below shows the approximate location of the Soma mine in Soma, Manisa Province, Turkey.

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Project Details

  • Owner: Ege Linyitleri Isletme Muessesesii Mudurlugu
  • Parent company: TKI
  • Location: Soma, Manisa Province, Turkey
  • GPS coordinates: 39.083006, 27.539574 (approximate)
  • Mine status: operating
  • Start year:
  • Mineable reserves:
  • Coal type:
  • Mine size:
  • Mine type: underground
  • Production: 10.5 MTPA
  • Reserves:

Articles and resources

References

  1. Philip M. Mobbs, "2010 Minerals Yearbook: Turkey", United States Geological Survey, April 2012, page 56.7
  2. "Turkish mine disaster: Unions call protest strike". BBC News. Retrieved 15 May 2014.
  3. Constanze Letsch. "Turkey: miners and mourners scorn government that 'laughs at our pain'". the Guardian. Retrieved 19 May 2015.
  4. "Turkey mine disaster: firm claims 'unprecedented' fire". TurkishPress.com. 15 May 2014. Retrieved 15 May 2014.
  5. "Four people arrested over Turkey mine disaster". TurkishPress.com. 18 May 2014. Retrieved 18 May 2014.
  6. "Turkish mine disaster town under lockdown as death toll rises to 301". Reuters. Retrieved 18 May 2014.
  7. "301 İşçimizin Cenazesi Ailelerine Teslim Edildi". AFAD. 16 May 2014. Retrieved 19 May 2014.
  8. "Kurtulan madencilerin isimleri açıklandı". ntvmsnbc. 17 May 2014. Retrieved 17 May 2014.
  9. "Elim Kazadan Sağ Kurtulanlar". AFAD. 17 May 2014. Retrieved 17 May 2014.
  10. "Destici: Soma'da ölen madenci sayısı 302 değil 344". Bugün. Archived from the original on 19 May 2014. Retrieved 18 May 2014.
  11. "Soma'da ölü sayısı en az 350". Sözcü. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  12. "Soma'dan sıcak bilgiler". Oda TV. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  13. Saul, Heather (14 May 2014). "Turkey coal mine explosion: Protests erupt in Soma after PM claims 'explosions like these happen all the time'". The Independent. Retrieved 14 May 2014.
  14. Turkey ‘aims to hold tenders for at least five coal mines in 2018’, Hürriyet Daily News, 10 April 2018
  15. 139 milyon ton kömür satılıyor, Cumhuriyet, 28 April 2018

Related SourceWatch articles

External resources

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