Fourchon LNG Terminal

From Global Energy Monitor
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Fourchon LNG Terminal is a proposed LNG terminal in Louisiana, United States.

Location

The terminal is planned for Port Fourchon, Louisiana. It will be built to the west of Belle Pass on a 150-acre site located on property owned by the Greater Lafourche Port Commission, outside of the existing developments of Port Fourchon.[1]

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Phase 1 Project Details

  • Owner: Fourchon LNG
  • Parent: Energy World
  • Location: Port Fourchon, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, United States
  • Coordinates: 29.105833, -90.194444 (approximate)
  • Capacity: 2 mtpa[2]
  • Status: Proposed[3]
  • Type: Export
  • Start Year: 2021[3]

Note: mtpa = million tonnes per year; bcfd = billion cubic feet per day

Phase 2 Project Details

  • Owner: Fourchon LNG
  • Parent: Energy World
  • Location: Port Fourchon, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, United States
  • Coordinates: 29.105833, -90.194444 (approximate)
  • Capacity: 3 mtpa[2]
  • Status: Proposed[3]
  • Type: Export
  • Start Year: 2023[3]

Note: mtpa = million tonnes per year; bcfd = billion cubic feet per day

Background

In August of 2017, Fourchon LNG of Energy World filed an application with Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for a LNG Terminal at Port Fourchon in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. It will have a total capacity of 5 mtpa (0.7 bcfd), with 2 mtpa in phase I and 3 mtpa in phase II. Its estimated cost is US$888 million.[2][1]

According to Energy World's website, construction will begin in Q1 2020, with Phase 1 entering commercial operations in Q2 of 2021 and Phase 2 entering commercial operations in Q2 of 2023. As of March 2020, there have been no reports that construction has actually begun.[3]

A Waterway Suitability Assessment is expected to be completed in Q1 of 2020. The assessment is one of multiple that is needed before construction can begin. Port Fourchon Executive Director Chett Chiasson said in September of 2019 that they hope to receive full authorization within two years, meaning that construction is at least two years behind schedule.[4]

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