Gorlovsky coal mine

From Global Energy Monitor
This article is part of the Global Coal Mine Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor.
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Gorlovsky Coal Mine is a surface mine in Novosibirsk Oblast, Russia.[1]

Location

The map below shows the exact location of the mine, near Belovo, in Iskitimsky District, Novosibirsk Oblast, Russia.[2]

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Background

Siberian Anthracite (Sibanthracite) owns and operates the mine. The mine produces anthracite coal, 90% of which is exported to the European Union, China, and other markets. Coal is transported via rail to a number of different ports in the Russian Far East and the Black Sea; including [[Port Taman] and the Port of Ust-Luga. [3] The coal has a methane concentration of 15.3m3 per tonne. [4]

According to a study published in Seismic Instruments, the number of earthquakes in the Gorlovsky Region has increased in the years following the development of coal mines in the area. These earthquakes have included a 4.3 magnitude quake which effected the city of Novosibirsk. The study found that the intensification of mining activity in the basin was highly likely to have been a contributing factor to the earthquake. [5]

Mine Details

  • Operator:Siberian Anthracite[1]
  • Owner:Siberian Anthracite[1]
  • Location: Belovo, Iskitimsky District, Novosibirsk Oblast, Russia[1]
  • Coordinates: 54.56819, 83.58942 (exact)
  • Status: Operating
  • Capacity: 5 million tonnes per annum (Mtpa)[6]
  • Total Reserves:
  • Mineable Reserves: 24.3 million tonnes[1]
  • Coal Type: ANTHRACITE (Met)
  • Mine Type: SURFACE
  • Start Year: 1976[1]
  • Source of Financing:


Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Siberian Anthracite LLC , "Facilities: Novosibirsk Region", Sibanthracite website, Accessed March 2021
  2. Разрез «Горловский», Wikimapia, accessed Apr. 2021.
  3. Siberian Anthracite LLC, "Facilities: Novosibirsk Region", Sibanthracite website, Accessed March 2021
  4. Global Methane, "Russian Federation", Global Methane website, Accessed April 2021
  5. A. F. Emanova, A. A. Emanova, O. V. Pavlenkoc, A. V. Fateeva, O. V. Kuprisha, and V. G. Podkorytovaa, Seismic Instruments, 2020, Vol. 56, No. 3, "Kolyvan Earthquake of January 9, 2019, with ML = 4.3 and Induced Seismicity Features of the Gorlovsky Coal Basin", Accessed April 2021
  6. Wikipedia, Gorlovsky Coal Mine", Wikipedia website, Accessed April 2021

External articles