Iran-Pakistan Pipeline

From Global Energy Monitor
This article is part of the Global Fossil Infrastructure Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor.
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Iran-Pakistan (IP) Gas Pipeline, also known as the Peace Pipeline, is a proposed pipeline which would deliver gas from Iran into Pakistan.[1]

Location

If the project is realized, it would deliver natural gas from Iran's South Pars field to Baluchistan and Sindh provinces in Pakistan.[2]

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Project Details

  • Owner: Ministry of Petroleum of Iran
  • Proposed capacity: 1,412.6 million cubic feet per day
  • Length: 1,880 km / 1,168 mi
  • Status: Proposed
  • Start Year:

Background

The Iran-Pakistan pipeline emerged from a plan dating as far back as 1994 and once included India. After India pulled out of the plans for the original pipeline project in 2008, known as the Iran-Pakistan-India (IPI) or Peace Pipeline, Iran and Pakistan remained in partnership and signed a deal in 2009[3] The pipeline's construction was planned to begin in 2012 and be completed by 2014.

However, the project is currently in jeopardy of being canceled as Pakistan has failed to commit to the construction of its portion of the pipeline. U.S. sanctions on Iran in 2012 caused Pakistan to backtrack on the project; even though sanctions have since been lifted, Pakistan has not recommitted to the project. Additionally, in 2015, Pakistan agreed to import gas from Qatar, further weakening the possibility and economic necessity for Pakistan to complete the pipeline.[4]

In October 2018 the speaker of the Iranian parliament Ari Larijani blamed the ongoing threat of U.S. sanctions on Iran for the delay in building the pipeline.[5] As of May 2019 the Pakistani section of the pipeline had been completed but Iranian officials stated that it was impossible to build the Iranian section while U.S. sanctions were in place.[6]

From 2017 to 2019 there were no development updates to the project. But in September 2019, the Inter State Gas Systems (ISGS) of Pakistan and the National Iranian Gas Company (NIGC) drafted a new agreement for the construction of the pipeline. Under the new agreement, the countries would "mutually chalk out a practical solution for the completion of the project" and Pakistan would be expected to construct its part of the project by 2024.[7]

Route

The Iranian section of the pipeline is 1,100km long. It starts from the Pars energy economic zone to Iranshahr and to Bushehr. It then passes through Fars, Kerman, Hormozghan and sistan – Baluchistan. The Pakistani portion of the pipeline will be approximately 780km long from Pakistan border to Nawabshah. About 665km of the section will run through Balochistan and 115km through Sindh.[8]

Articles and resources

References

  1. Iran, Pakistan discuss IP pipeline, Azer News, December 1, 2017
  2. Iran-Pakistan Pipeline, Hydrocarbons Technology, accessed February, 2018
  3. Damir Kaletovic, Iran May Cancel $7B Pipeline Project With Pakistan, Oilprice.com, January 27, 2017
  4. Iran Urges Decision on Delayed IP Gas Pipeline, Financial Tribune, August 1, 2017
  5. U.S. renews pressure against Iran-Pakistan gas pipeline: official, Kallanish Energy, Oct. 11, 2018
  6. Iran-Pakistan gas pipeline, Wikipedia, July 2020
  7. "ISGS, NIGC ink revised accord for IP gas pipeline project | The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 2019-09-16. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  8. Iran-Pakistan Pipeline, Hydrocarbons Technology, accessed February, 2018

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External resources

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