Moscow CHP-22 power station

From Global Energy Monitor

Moscow CHP-22 power station (also known as CHP-22 named after N.I. Serebryanikov, ТЭЦ-22 Мосэнерго, ТЭЦ-22 им. Н.И. Серебряникова) is a 1,110-megawatt (MW) power plant in Moscow province, Russia that burns natural gas and coal (as the reserve fuel).[1] The company has announced its plans to switch the power plant to operate on natural gas with fuel oil as the reserve fuel.[2][3]

Location

The undated satellite photo below shows the plant, which is in Dzerzhinsky town, Moscow province.

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Background on Plant

The 11-unit, 1,405-MW gas-fired Moscow CHP-22 power station is owned by Gazprom. The plant’s 11 units were brought online between 1960 and 1973.[4][5][6] [2] In 2014 a plan to rebuild Unit 9 with an increased capacity of 335 MW was announced. The rebuilt unit was scheduled to be commissioned in 2021.[6] The old Unit 9 with 300 MW capacity was retired in 2016.[7] In October 2017, Gazprom announced that it would spend 10 billion rubles ($160 million) to replace turbines at Moscow CHP-22.[8] By August 2020, work on reconstruction of Unit 9 was underway.[9] As of April 2021, the new Unit 9 capacity was expected to be 295 MW.[2] As of January 2022, there were no official announcements about the completion of the reconstruction project, suggesting that work was ongoing. According to Mosenergo Annual Report 2020 released in April 2021, there are also future plans to refurbish Unit 10 by 2024 with the new unit's capacity being 250 MW.[2]

Conversion to fuel oil as reserve fuel

According to its operator Mosenergo the plant in 1998 was powered by natural gas (85.6%), coal (14.2%), and fuel oil (0.2%).[1][10] According to company reports, the plant currently runs on natural gas with coal being used as reserve fuel.[2] In 2018 it was reported that the plant would stop burning coal at an unspecified time in the future.[11] In December 2020 and April 2021, the company again mentioned their intention to switch the power plant to operate on fuel oil as the reserve fuel instead of coal.[2][3]

Plant Details

  • Sponsor: TGC-3 (Mosenergo)
  • Parent company: Gazprom
  • Location: Dzerzhinsky town, Moscow province, Russia
  • Coordinates: 55.634054, 37.818257 (exact)
  • Gross generating capacity (operating): 1,110 MW
    • Unit 1: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 65 MW[12] (start-up in 1960, replaced in 1985[1][13]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 2: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 65 MW[12] (start-up in 1960, replaced in 1986[1]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 3: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 65 MW[12] (start-up in 1961, replaced in 1987[1]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 4: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 65 MW[12] (start-up in 1961, replaced in 1988[1]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 5: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 65 MW[12] (start-up in 1963, replaced in 1989[1]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 6: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 65 MW[12] (start-up in 1963, replaced in 1990[1]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 7: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 110 MW[12][6][14] (start-up in 1965[1], replaced in 2001[6]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 8: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 110 MW[12][6][14] (start-up in 1966[1], replaced in 2003[6]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
    • Unit 10: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 250 MW[12][6][14] (start-up in 1972[6][14]), planned retire 2024[2]
    • Unit 11: Gas- and coal-fired[2][3] steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 250 MW[12][6][14] (start-up in 1973[6][14]), converting to fuel oil as reserve fuel
  • Gross generating capacity (construction)[9]: 335 MW
  • Gross generating capacity (announced)[2]: 250 MW
    • Unit 10R: Gas- and fuel oil-fired[2], steam turbine[6] with CHP[12], 250 MW[2] (expected start-up in 2024[2])
  • Gross generating capacity (retired): 250 MW
  • Type (coal): Subcritical (Units 1-8); Supercritical (Units 9-11)

Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 ТЭЦ-22, Mosenergo, accessed December 2018
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 "Mosenergo Annual Report 2020" (PDF). Mosenergo.gazprom.ru. May 21, 2021. Retrieved Apr 18, 2022.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 "ТЭЦ-22 имени Нестора Ивановича Серебрянникова 60 лет!". tvugresha.ru. Dec 24, 2020. Retrieved Apr 18, 2022.
  4. Global Power Plant Database, World Resources Institute, Version 1.0.0, April 2018.
  5. TEP-22 Thermal Power Plant Russia, Global Energy Observatory, accessed June 2018.
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 6.11 6.12 6.13 6.14 6.15 6.16 6.17 6.18 6.19 6.20 6.21 6.22 6.23 ТЭЦ-22, Wikipedia (Russian), accessed June 2019.
  7. 7.0 7.1 Энергоблок №9 ТЭЦ-22 готовится к демонтажу в рамках реконструкции, Neftegaz, Mar. 10, 2016
  8. "Газпром энергохолдинг" вложит в модернизацию турбины на ТЭЦ-22 в Подмосковье 10 млрд руб, TASS, 6 Oct. 2017.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Комплекс электромонтажных работ по реконструкции энергоблока №9 ТЭЦ-22 - филила ПАО "Мосэнерго", EUM, Aug. 4, 2020
  10. "ТЭЦ-22". Energybase.ru. Retrieved Apr 18, 2022.
  11. Вместо автобусов пассажиров в Москве будут возить электробусы, News Vostok, Aug. 8, 2018
  12. 12.00 12.01 12.02 12.03 12.04 12.05 12.06 12.07 12.08 12.09 12.10 12.11 12.12 12.13 12.14 12.15 12.16 12.17 12.18 12.19 12.20 12.21 12.22 12.23 12.24 12.25 ТЭЦ-22 им. Н.И. Серебряникова, Mosenergo, accessed Sep 3, 2021
  13. Мероприятия межрегиональной программы газификации города Москвы и Московской области на период 2019-2023 гг, Ministry of Energy
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 ТЭЦ-22 им. Н.И. Серебряникова, Mosenergo Inform, accessed Sep 3, 2021
  15. "Схема и программа развития Единой энергетической системы России на 2021 – 2027 годы". Ministry of Energy of the Russian Federation (Minenergo). Feb 26, 2021. Retrieved Apr 13, 2022.

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