Southern Trails Gas Pipeline

From Global Energy Monitor
This article is part of the Global Fossil Infrastructure Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor.
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Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline is an operating natural gas pipeline.[1]

Location

The pipeline runs from the San Juan Basin near Farmington, New Mexico to delivery interconnects in California.

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Project Details

  • Operator: Dominion Energy
  • Parent Company: Dominion Energy
  • Current capacity: 87 million cubic feet per day[2]
  • Length: 405 miles / 651.8 km[2]
  • Diameter: 16-inches[2]
  • Cost: US$100 million[2]
  • Status: Operating[2]
  • Start Year: 2002[2]

Background

The Southern Trails Gas Pipeline is operated and owned by Dominion Energy.[1] The pipeline was originally built to carry crude oil and had an 487-mile eastern branch in New Mexico and a 210-mile western branch in California.[3] The eastern branch was converted to carry natural gas by Questar Energy in 2002, while plans to convert the western branch were never realized.

In November 2017 the Navajo Tribal Utilities Authority announced that it had initiated negotiations to acquire Southern Trails Pipeline, after Dominion Energy announced it was planning to abandon the system, which runs through the Navajo Nation along U.S. Highway 160 and parts of northwestern New Mexico. With the transfer, Dominion Energy has committed itself to establishing new line taps to add connections along the pipeline before it hands over full ownership to NTUA.[4]

Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Southern Trails Pipeline, Dominion Energy, accessed January 2018
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Natural Gas Data, Pipeline Projects Energy Information Agency, accessed July 21, 2020
  3. Questar's Southern Trails pipeline ready to bring natural gas to California state line Power Engineering International, Jun. 26, 2002
  4. NTUA To Retain And Expand Natural Gas Services for Navajo, Lake Powell Life, Nov. 28, 2017

Related GEM.wiki articles

External resources

External articles