Tempino to Plaju Crude Oil Pipeline (TPCOP)

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Tempino to Plaju Crude Oil Pipeline (TPCOP) is an oil pipeline in Indonesia.[1]

Location

The pipeline originates at storage tanks in Tempino, Jambi, and terminates at the Plaju refinery in South Sumatra, Plaju, Indonesia.

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Project Details

  • Operator: Pertamina Gas[1]
  • Current capacity: 240,000 barrels per day
  • Length: 166 miles / 267 kilometers
  • Status: Operating
  • Start Year: 2012

Background

In September 2012, Pertamina Gas awarded Telvent and its parent company Schneider Electric a contract to automate and modernize the TPCOP, supplementing an 80-year-old existing manpower-operated pipeline.[2] Specifically, the contract stipulated that Telvent would provide pipeline monitoring technology, liquids management system, and station control equipments, while Schneider Electric would offer automation equipments and shutdown system for the TPCOP project.

In October 2012, Pertamina announced an investment of $90 million to build a new 267 km pipline with a 15,000 barrel-per-day transport capacity (although other sources suggest the pipeline's capacity is actually up to 24,000 barrels per day[3]), an increase over the 11,000 barrels per day offered by the existing pipeline.[4] The pipeline would be place two meters underground and additional security measures added to deter oil theft.[4]

In July 2013, just a week after the upgrades were completed on 8 July, Pertamina closed the pipeline due to continued illegal tapping and oil theft.[3] In the eight days of operation, nearly 17,500 barrels of crude oil were stolen.[3] The pipeline was initially expected to be closed for up to six months; however, as of November 2017, it is unclear if or when the pipeline was reopened.

Pertamina estimates that oil theft from TPCOP costs it roughly US$40 million annually.[5]

Accidents

On 3 October 2012, five people died and 18 people were injured after the TPCOP caught fire when the pipeline was being illegally tapped.[6] The final death toll was later increased to nine.[3] Officials reported that 29,000 barrels were stolen in September 2012 and nearly 250,000 barrels were stolen between May and September 2012.[6]

In February 2018 the pipeline leaked near Desa Gajah Mati in South Sumatra.[7]

Articles and resources

References

Related GEM.wiki articles

Existing Pipelines in Indonesia

External resources

External articles