Zasyadko Coal Mine

From Global Energy Monitor
This article is part of the Global Coal Mine Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor.
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The A. F. Zasyadko coal mine is an operating underground coal mine in Donetsk oblast, Ukraine.

Location

The map below shows the location of the mine, in Donetsk City municipality, Donetsk oblast, Ukraine. It is located within the city of Donetsk, in the city's Kyivs'kyi district. The mine is located within the rebel-controlled territory of the so-called Donetsk People's Republic.

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Background

The A. F. Zasyadko coal mine is an underground coal mine in Donetsk, Ukraine. The mine is named after Alexander Fyodorovich Zasyadko, the Soviet Minister of Coal in the early 1950s. The mine was opened in 1958. It was privatized in the early 1990s, and today is owned by Public Joint Stock Company A. F. Zasyadko Mine, a company with unclear ownership. (Wikipedia states that the mine's owner is Yukhym Zvyahilsky, a former Acting Prime Minister and a leader of the Russia-affiliated Party of Regions.[1])[2]

Current production statistics are unavailable. In 2011, the mine produced 2.0 million tons, down from 4 million in 2003.[2][1] The mine appears to still be operating, however — it opened a new longwall in January 2020.[3]

Accidents

The mine is extremely dangerous, and has been the site of repeated catastrophic accidents:[4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

  • May 24, 1999: 50 dead
  • Aug. 19, 2001: 55 dead
  • July 31, 2002: 20 dead
  • Sept. 20, 2006: 13 dead
  • Nov. 18, 2007: 101 dead
  • Dec. 2, 2007: 5 dead
  • Mar. 4, 2015: 34 dead


The November 18, 2007, accident, which killed 101 miners, was the deadliest mining accident in Ukrainian history. A massive methane explosion charred many miners' bodies beyond recognition.[9][12] Another accident several weeks later killed five more miners.[13]

The March 4, 2015, accident has an uncertain death toll, because the mine was at that point within rebel-controlled territory, and information about the accident was suppressed.[14]

A Russian mining wiki claims that people in Donetsk say, "If you want to get an apartment, marry a miner with Zasyadko, and wait until he dies." (The families of dead miners typically receive government compensation.)[2]

Project Details

  • Owner: Public Joint Stock Company A. F. Zasyadko Mine
  • Parent Company: unclear
  • Location: Donetsk City municipality, Donetsk oblast, Ukraine
  • GPS Coordinates: 48.052222, 37.789444 (exact)
  • Status: Operating
  • Production Capacity: 0.853 million tonnes (2013) [15]
  • Total Reserves: 144.6 (2013) [15]
  • Recoverable Reserves:
  • Coal type:
  • Mine Type: Underground
  • Start Year: 1958
  • Workforce:
  • Source of Financing:

Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Zasyadko coal mine, Wikipedia, accessed March 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Шахта имени А. Ф. Засядько, MiningWiki.ru, accessed March 2021.
  3. На шахте им. Засядько ввели в эксплуатацию новую лаву с запасами в 690 000 тонн угля, DNR-Pravda, 28 Jan. 2020.
  4. Dmitriy Korneychuk, Взрыв метана на шахте им. Засядько, Gazeta po-Kievskiy, 18 Nov. 2007.
  5. Ukraine mine blast kills 36, BBC News, 20 Aug. 2001.
  6. At Least 19 Killed in Ukraine Mine Explosion, New York Times, 1 Aug. 2002.
  7. Bagila Bukharbayeva, Soviet Coal Mine Accidents Kill 45, Associated Press, 20 Sept. 2006.
  8. Число погибших на шахте им. Засядько возросло до 5 человек, Korrespondent, 3 Dec. 2007.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Взрыв на шахте Засядько: число жертв достигло 90. Пожар продолжается, Korrespondent, 20 Nov. 2007.
  10. Ukraine's mine death toll rises, BBC News, 20 Nov. 2007.
  11. Директор шахты имени Засядько арестован, Deutsche Welle, 9 Mar. 2015.
  12. Luke Harding, More than 50 killed in Ukraine coal mine blast, The Guardian, 19 Nov. 2007.
  13. Число погибших на шахте им. Засядько возросло до 5 человек, Korrespondent, 3 Dec. 2007.
  14. Ukraine coal mine: Dozens feared dead in Zasyadko gas blast, BBC News, 4 Mar. 2015.
  15. 15.0 15.1 TASS, "Mine them. A.F. Zasyadko: dossier", TASS website, Accessed May 2021

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