ArcelorMittal Lázaro Cárdenas steel plant

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ArcelorMittal Lázaro Cárdenas steel plant (Siderúrgica Lázaro Cárdenas) is an integrated steel plant in Lázaro Cárdenas, Michoacán, Mexico.[1]

Location

The map below shows the location of the steel plant in Lázaro Cárdenas, Michoacán, Mexico.

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Background

Occupying a nearly 1000-hectare site on Mexico's Pacific coast, ArcelorMittal Lázaro Cárdenas is Mexico's largest steel plant. The plant commenced operations in 1976 as a government-owned enterprise under the name Sicartsa (Siderúrgica Lázaro Cárdenas – Las Truchas).[2][3]

The plant's 6.4 million tons of steel-making capacity are split between two units. The original long steel division, known initially as Sicartsa I and subsequently renamed ArcelorMittal México Aceros Largos, uses traditional blast furnace/basic oxygen furnace technology.[4] The newer flat steel division, originally named Sicartsa II and later renamed ArcelorMittal México Aceros Planos, was built in the early 1980s incorporating a variety of state-of-the-art equipment including a pelletizing plant, a battery of four electric arc furnaces, and the world's first DRI (direct reduced iron) plant using the HyL III technology pioneered by Mexican steelmaker Hylsa.[5][6]

In the early 1990s, as the Mexican government moved to privatize its national steel industry, Sicartsa I was sold to the Mexican steel company Grupo Villacero[7], while Sicartsa II was acquired by Indonesia-based Ispat International.[3]

In 2005, Ispat International merged with International Steel Group and LNM Holdings N.V. to create Mittal Steel, which in turn acquired European steel giant Arcelor S.A. in 2006 to form the international conglomerate ArcelorMittal.[8] Later that year, ArcelorMittal acquired the Sicartsa I plant from Grupo Villacero, reuniting both halves of the Lázaro Cárdenas plant under a single owner with the new name ArcelorMittal Lázaro Cárdenas.[9]

Today the long steel division, with a capacity of 2.4 million tons per annum, specializes in rod and wire rod for the construction industry[4] and accounts for roughly three eighths of the plant's production.[1] The flat steel division, with a capacity of 4 million tpa, specializes in steel slabs destined for a wide range of international markets[6], accounting for the remaining five eights of the plant's production.[1] Iron ore for the pelletizing facility is shipped directly from ArcelorMittal's Las Truchas mine to the steel plant via a 27-kilometer ferroduct.[10]

Plant Details

Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 "Factbook 2019" (PDF). ArcelorMittal. April 30, 2020.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 "Un vistazo de ArcelorMittal México". ArcelorMittal. Retrieved 2020-09-05.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "Nuestra Historia". ArcelorMittal Mexico. Retrieved 2020-09-05.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 "Aceros Largos". ArcelorMittal Mexico (in español). Retrieved 2020-09-05.
  5. "The extraordinary story of Mittal Steel". Rediff. March 17, 2005.
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 "Aceros Planos". ArcelorMittal Mexico. Retrieved 2020-09-05.
  7. "Mexico Will Sell 3 Big Steel Firms for $885 Million". Los Angeles Times. November 23, 1991.
  8. "ArcelorMittal acquisition timeline: historic company profile". Steel on the Net. Retrieved 2020-09-10.
  9. "Arcelor Mittal buys Mexico's Sicartsa for $1.44 bln". Reuters. December 20, 2006.
  10. 10.0 10.1 "Ubicación de las Minas". ArcelorMittal Mexico (in español). Retrieved 2020-09-05.
  11. "Reporte de Sustentabilidad: Mexico 2018" (PDF). ArcelorMittal.
  12. 12.0 12.1 "2020 AIST North and South American DRI Roundup". AIST (Association for Iron & Steel Technology). Retrieved 2020-09-17.
  13. "2020 AIST North American Blast Furnace Roundup". AIST (Association for Iron & Steel Technology). 2020.
  14. "Origen y desarrollo del Complejo de Siderúrgica Lázaro Cárdenas-Las Truchas" (PDF). Comercio Exterior. October 1975.
  15. "2020 AIST Basic Oxygen Furnace Roundup". AIST (Association for Iron & Steel Technology). Retrieved 2020-09-17.
  16. "2020 AIST Electric Arc Furnace Roundup". AIST (Association for Iron & Steel Technology). Retrieved 2020-09-17.

External resources

External articles