Direct reduced iron plant

From Global Energy Monitor
This article is part of the Global Steel Plant Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor.
Sub-articles:

Direct reduced iron (DRI), also called sponge iron,[1] is produced from the direct reduction of iron ore (in the form of lumps, pellets, or fines) to iron by a reducing gas or elemental carbon produced from natural gas or coal.

Direct reduction processes can be divided roughly into two categories: gas-based, and coal-based. In both cases, the objective of the process is to drive off the oxygen contained in various forms of iron ore (sized ore, concentrates, pellets, mill scale, furnace dust, etc.), in order to convert the ore to metallic iron, without melting it below 1200 C.[2]

The direct reduction process is comparatively energy efficient. Steel made using DRI requires significantly less fuel, in that a traditional blast furnace is not needed. DRI is most commonly made into steel using electric arc furnaces to take advantage of the heat produced by the DRI product.[2]

References

  1. "What is direct reduced iron (DRI)? definition and meaning". Businessdictionary.com. Retrieved 2011-07-11.
  2. 2.0 2.1 R. J. Fruehan, et al. (2000). Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel (for Selected Conditions)

External links

This page uses material from the Wikipedia page direct reduced iron under the provisions of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.