Tamar FLNG Terminal

From Global Energy Monitor
This article is part of the Global Fossil Infrastructure Tracker, a project of Global Energy Monitor.
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Tamar FLNG Terminal was a proposed LNG terminal in Tamar, Israel. There have been no development updates in over four years and the project is presumed to be cancelled.

Location

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Project Details

  • Owner: Isramco Negev 2 (28.75%), Chevron (25%), Delek Drilling (22%), Tamar Petroleum (16.75%), Dor Gas Exploration (4%), and Everest Infrastructures (3.5%)[1]
  • Location: Tamar, Eastern, Israel
  • Coordinates: 33.078333, 33.951389 (approximate)
  • Capacity: 3 mtpa, 0.43 bcfd
  • Status: Cancelled
  • Type: Export
  • Start Year:

Note: mtpa = million tonnes per year; bcfd = billion cubic feet per day

Background

Tamar FLNG Terminal was a proposed LNG terminal in Tamar, Israel located about 90 km off Israel’s coast.[2]

The floating terminal would have processed gas from the Tamar gas field, which had an estimated 9.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas in 2013[3] and in 2017 has an estimated 318 billion cubic meters of gas.[4]

There have been no development updates in over four years and the project is presumed to be cancelled.

Israel Gas

In 2017 natural gas provided 70% of Israel’s electric power.[4]

In 2010 Israel’s declared it would use its natural gas reserves to power cars and trucks. According to a study released August 2017 by the Samuel Neaman Institute for National Policy little has been done.[4]

Israel's demand for imported LNG began in 2011 following the disruption of Egyptian supplied gas and the depletion of the offshore Yam Tethys reservoir.[5]

Israel’s known gas reserves are 30 trillion cubic feet. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 2013 estimated at least twice as much could be had offshore that count meet Israel’s energy needs for the next 30 to 50 years.[6]

Reuters reported in 2013 that USGS predicts the greater eastern Mediterranean’s Levant basin could hold up to 122 trillion cubic feet of recoverable gas. This would make it one of the world’s greatest gas deposits.[3]

In August 2017 Haaretz reported that Egypt could open up its markets to Israel gas. In early August 2017 Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sissi signed legislation forming a gas regulatory authority and permitting private companies to import gas.[7]

Articles and resources

References

  1. Stuart Elliot, Partners in Israel's Tamar gas field reach new marketing settlement S&P Global, February 1, 2021
  2. Tamar FLNG Terminal, A Barrel Full, accessed April 2017
  3. 3.0 3.1 Reuters Staff, "Gazprom banks on floating terminal for Israeli LNG," Reuters, February 27, 2013.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Oren Dori read more: https://www.haaretz.com/.premium-1.804672, [ https://www.haaretz.com/.premium-1.804672 "Israeli Government Failing to Encourage Natural Gas Use in Transport Sector,"] Haaretz, August 2, 2017.
  5. Hedy Cohen, "What does Israel Electric Corp actually pay for gas?," Globes, April 10, 2016.
  6. Martin Fletcher, "Israel’s Big Gusher," Slate, February 26, 2014.
  7. Eran Azran, "Egypt Clears the Way for Imports of Israeli Natural Gas," Haaretz, August 9, 2017.

Related GEM.wiki articles

External resources

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