Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex steel plant

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Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex (김책제철연합기업소 (Korean), 김책제철소 (Korean), 金策製鐵聯合企業所 (Chinese)) is an integrated and electric steel plant in Songpyong-guyok, Chongjin, North Hamgyŏng Province, North Korea.[1][2][3]

Location

The map below shows the location of the steel plant in Songpyong-guyok, Chongjin, North Hamgyŏng Province, North Korea.

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Background

History

Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex is North Korea's oldest and largest steel mill, consisting of two steelmaking complexes (North Complex and South Complex).[1] Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex was constructed while Korea was under Japanese rule from 1910 to 1945. The plant was rebuilt with support from former USSR and China.[4] The Soviet Union provided technology and equipment for steel production in 1975. In 1996, equipment for producing pig iron without coke and low-carbon steel was installed.[5]

Operation issues

Coke supplies for Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex have been unstable since Russia stopped supplying the plant after Kim Il Sung's death in 1994.[5] Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex has shut down periodically due to lack of coal and electricity, including known instances in 1993, 1994, 1995, 2011, and 2014 (possibly more often than that). The Kim Chaek plant has rarely operated at full capacity since the 1990s, with some reports indicating operation at half or less capacity. [1][5][6]

Steel for weapons development

In March 2020, Daily NK reported that North Korea is aiming to increase its production of steel for weapons development, with the goal of selling these weapons abroad for foreign currency.[7]

Juche steel

The Kim Chaek steel and Sŏngjin steel complexes produce "juche steel" (steel produced from domestic, rather than imported coal and energy).[6] Hwanghae Iron and Steel Complex steel plant was also tasked with producing "juche steel" in October 2018.[8]

Plant Details

Articles and resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex: Down but Not Out, 38 North, Joseph S. Bermudez Jr. and Andy Dinville, Jun. 20, 2016, Retrieved on: May 27, 2020
  2. 2.0 2.1 Chongjin - the city of Iron, Korea Konsult, Retrieved on: May 27, 2020
  3. 3.0 3.1 Kim Chaek Iron and Steel Complex, Wikipedia, Retrieved on: May 27, 2020
  4. North Korea Handbook, Yonhap News Agency, Seoul, M.E. Sharpe, Dec. 27, 2002
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 Kim Ch'aek Iron and Steel Complex, Nuclear Threat Initiative, Apr. 1, 2003 Retrieved on: May 27, 2020
  6. 6.0 6.1 Juche steel, Stephan Haggard (Peterson Institute for International Economics), Feb. 9, 2011, Retrieved on: May 27, 2020
  7. 7.0 7.1 N. Korea ramps up steel production for weapons development, Jang Seul Gi, Daily NK, Mar. 19, 2020, Retrieved on: May 27, 2020
  8. North Korea says self reliant iron facility will begin production, Elizabeth Shim, UPI, Oct. 1, 2018, Retrieved on: May 27, 2020
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 Developments in Steelmaking Capacity of Non-OECD Economies 2013, OECD Publishing, Aug. 12, 2014
  10. North Korea Development Report 2002/03, Edited by Choong Yong Ahn, Korea Institute for International Economic Policy
  11. If the North Korean market is lifted, what are the opportunities for Chinese steel mills? (Chinese), Sohu, Jul. 11, 2018, Retrieved on: Jun. 9, 2020

External resources

External articles